trabajar en japón
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, president of the Liberal Democratic Party, points a reporter during a press conference in Tokyo, Monday, July 22, 2013. Abe has been striving since he took office in December to convince the public he has the wherewithal to lead a revival of the worldfs No. 3 economy. With the victory of his ruling coalition in Sundayfs election for the upper house of parliament, he now must deliver on that promise. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

Trabajar en Japón ahora más fácil, Shinzo Abe trabaja en agilizar el visado

Aunque todavía quedan ciertos flecos por definir, el primer ministro japonés, Shinzo Abe, perteneciente al Partido Liberal Democrático  (自由民主党, Jiyū-Minshutō, abreviado PLD), pretende presentar un paquete de medidas que favorezca la llegada de trabajadores y estudiantes extranjeros al archipiélago japonés. Esta decisión del Sr. Abe se incorpora al programa de su partido en las próximas elecciones parlamentarias de Julio, ya que según en palabras propias ” si no se toma esta decisión, nuestro país sufrirá efectos graves porque los japoneses son insuficientes para generar toda la energía de trabajo necesaria en un futuro“.

Básicamente se procurará acelerar la consecución del visado, así como de otros tipos de documentación requerida, en un amplio sector de trabajadores de alta cualificación; entre ellos podemos incluir becarios de diversos tipos de disciplinas, a los que además se les facilitaría la obtención de la plaza laboral fija una vez se finalice la beca; constructores que se ocupen de los proyectos arquitectónicos necesarios para las próximas Olimpiadas de Tokio de 2020;  e incluso asistentes de ancianos que se encarguen de velar por el cada vez mayor número de personas mayores imposibilitadas en las islas.

Trabajar en Japón para los inmigrantes, una difícil tarea

Esta serie de disposiciones avivan aún más el acalorado debate de la inmigración en Japón, un país férreo a la hora de conceder permisos de residencia por la sospecha de que los extranjeros aumentarían los índices de criminalidad entre otros muchos problemas. En este sentido, voces autorizadas como Toshihiro Menju, director del “Japan Center for International Exchange“, advierten que dicha incorporación de foráneos al mundo laboral japonés sería cuanto menos traumática, pues exigiría una serie de ajustes legales demasiado repentinos, por no mencionar el shock que presumiblemente supondría para el tejido social de corte más tradicionalista.

El debate está servido.


Fuentes:

  • Texto creado por Antonio Míguez [CoolJapan.es]
  • Fuente primaria: Japan moves

Acerca Antonio Míguez

Antonio Míguez Santa Cruz, profesor colaborador honorario de la Universidad de Córdoba y miembro del Grupo de investigación de Frontera Global de la Universidad de Alcalá. Sus líneas de investigación giran en torno al contacto entre ibéricos y japoneses durante los siglos XVI y XVII, así como sobre el Cine fantástico japonés. Ha sido autor de varios artículos de revistas científicas y episodios de libro, además de organizar congresos y seminarios de temática japonesa.

Visitar también

Sorteo Japan Box gracias a Jnto con motivo de Natsu Valencia Online

BASES LEGALES DE PARTICIPACIÓN EN EL SORTEO 1.- ENTIDAD ORGANIZADORA DE EL SORTEO La Asociación …

Entrevista a R. Ibarzabal, autor de Crónicas de los samuráis

Japón seduce. A estas alturas ya es difícilmente creíble la idea de que la fascinación …

TIFF 2020

TIFF 2020, otoño de festivales y pandemia

Como cada otoño, Tokio se viste de cine acogiendo sus dos principales certámenes cinematográficos. Este …